Boundaries – How my books were born

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Initially, Boundaries was a romantic Sci-Fi novelette (only about 17000 words,) titled Crossing Boundaries. I wrote it and forgot about it. It sat in my drawer for about a year, but Gabriela, Landon, and Jack kept nagging, telling me that the story wasn’t finished.

Needless to say that the trio disturbed me from watching funny cat videos and interacting with my Facebook friends. But I finally gave into their demands and once I started writing it, the words just kept flowing. I felt as if I was in the scenes with my characters.

I finished writing it in 2014. Also in 2014, Boundaries was a finalist at World’s Best Story.

I immediately fell in love with Landon. He is definitely my favorite character in the book. The perfect gentleman. The man every woman dreams of.

Gabriela is a little “undecided”, but she really cracked me up more than once. I love her sense of humor and her feistiness.

Bianca is Gabriela’s best friend and she is funny and terribly sarcastic. While she is a secondary character, she complements well the two main characters – Gabriela and Landon.

Jack comes in the picture only vaguely in the beginning, but he sure creates a lot of problems for everyone. He turns out to be one twist in the story that no one expects.

I had a lot of fun writing it, and found myself laughing at their jokes and almost try to comfort them when they were sad or frustrated.

Visit my author page at http://www.amazon.com/Ica-Iova/e/B00EN8ZH2G/ for this book as well as my other books.

Unsung Victims – How my books were born

When I tell people that I am an author they immediately get curious; about the process of writing a book, about where I get my ideas, etc. To write a book it takes more than a pen, a bunch of papers, and some imagination. A lot more. It takes hours of research, missed lunches and dinners, countless hours of back-breaking writing, re-writing, editing, pots of coffee, bottles of Tylenol for back pain, and a lot more.

To help you understand what I’m talking about, I created a new category called *How my books were born* where I will share with you a short history about the making of each one of my books.

I will start with Unsung Victims.

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Unsung Victims is book one in the Resiliency Series. It was not an easy book to write. Beside the facts mentioned above, when I wrote Unsung Victims, I went through every emotion with my characters. I cried with them and laughed with them as we traveled from a beautiful beginning, true romance really, to open hostility. The book has a sentimental value to me because it is based on the story of someone near and dear to my heart.

Divorce happens every day. We all know someone who is divorced or divorcing. We might have seen someone rise from the ashes of their divorce and forge ahead. We might have seen others who never get the strength to move on and start a better life. But what most people don’t think about is that the pain and discomfort of divorce is only known to those who go through it. In Unsung Victims art imitates life. Even under the best of circumstances, while going through a divorce people are compelled to act in a way they wouldn’t normally act under any other circumstances.

Though no longer the ugly word it once was, divorce must be one of the hardest decisions someone has to make. Your entire world crumbles with that single word. Everything comforting and stable and reliable, crumbles with that single word, and the decision to part ways is always painful because it affects not only the couple but those around its epicenter – children, parents, in-laws, friends and acquaintances.

(A friend of mine once said, “If you’re widowed you get all the sympathy going, death benefits and all the family assets. Divorced, and you’re suddenly perceived as a danger to other people’s spouses, lose most of everything you’ve worked for, and have to sink or swim on your own.”)

Here is another fact that few people, who haven’t been affected by divorce, consider. There is no justice, no sense of equality, in Family Court. One spouse has the house, the other one doesn’t. One parent has the kids, the other one doesn’t – even in a fifty/fifty custody – when the children are with the mother, they don’t have a father; when they are with the father, they don’t have a mother.

In Unsung Victims, both, Johanna and Louis make mistakes. Johanna is railroaded by Louis’ anger and by the system, her children are put in jeopardy, and they might not love her with the same innocence as before the divorce.  I like happy endings, but in real life one is never guaranteed.

Book 2, Resilience, is expected to be released before the end of this year.

My Interview With World’s Best Story

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As many of you may know, Boundaries was a finalist at World’s Best Story 2014. Check out my interview. Thank you, FastPencil and World’s Best Story for this amazing experience.

 

Q: Your story Boundaries made it to the top 10 of the 2014 edition of World’s Best Story. Did you think you were going to make it so far? How did you react when you got the news live from The Toronto International Book Fair during the live finale this past November?

Clearly, I was hoping that my book would make it or otherwise I wouldn’t have entered it. Though Boundaries had been written some time ago, it was not edited. I am usually a very realistic person and though I knew the story was compelling, I didn’t think it would make it that far because of the editing issues. Keep in mind that Boundaries was competing against books that were already published and had hundreds of reviews for crying out loud. I was very happy to see that the judges were able to look past those grammatical and other mistakes and see the story’s potential.

Q: Can you tell us a little more about the story and how you came up with such engaging characters?

Initially, Boundaries was a romantic Sci-Fi novelette (only about 17000 words,) titled Crossing Boundaries. It had sat in my drawer for about a year, but Gabriela, Landon, and Jack kept nagging, telling me that the story wasn’t finished.

Needless to say that the trio disturbed me from watching funny cat videos and interacting with my Facebook friends. But I finally gave into their demands and once I started writing it, the words kept flowing. I felt as if I was in the scenes with my characters. I immediately fell in love with Landon and though Gabriela is a little “undecided”, she is funny, prickly and terribly sarcastic. Jack comes in the picture only vaguely in the beginning, but he sure creates a lot of problems for everyone. He turns out to be the twist in the story that no one expected. I had a lot of fun writing it, and found myself laughing at their jokes and almost try to comfort them when they were sad or frustrated.

Follow the link bellow to read the full interview.

http://worldsbeststory.com/en/lounge/qa-with-ica-iova